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Idaho Mountain Block in Country Living Magazine

Country Living Quilt

Country Living magazine is celebrating its 40th anniversary this year, and they put together a collaborative quilt with 50 blocksβ€”one made by a quilter in each state. When they asked me to make a block representing Idaho, I happily obliged. Find it on the second row, all the way to the right.

Mountain quilt block by Angela Bowman

Nothing says “Idaho” quite like a mountain. I was inspired by the work of Rick MurphyΒ and translated his art into a mountain quilt block. To me, it represents Castle Peak in the White Cloud Mountains, one of my Dad’s favorite hunting spots. Who knew that half-square triangles make great mountain peaks? I used 3 Kona Cotton fabrics I got fromΒ Sewfinity: Breeze (light), Peacock (medium), and Indigo (dark).

Country Living Magazine - September 2018The quilt appears on page 72 in the September 2018 issue of Country Living magazine, and it will also be on display at Country Living Fairs and other events.

BB8 Quilt

Oh BB8, you cute little guy. I designed and made this for a BB8 collector as part of the 2018 May the 4th Mini Quilt Swap #MayThe4thMQS3. It measures 24″ x 24″. The designed started with a photo, applied some digital effects, put it in a grid, and then translated it into a foundation paper piecing (FPP) sewing pattern using all straight lines. Here’s the digital version:

Here’s my organized start:

Then as I sew, it turns into this:

Each block is just a little over 5 inches square.

Blocks done, now to sew them together.

Here’s what the back looks like when they’re all joined.

Then with the paper removed, before pressing.

A simple cross hatch quilting grid.

Binding. With my Quality Assurance Inspector πŸ™‚

So many little pieces on this guy. If I ever make it again, I’ll simplify the design a bit. Before I started sewing, I was about to redesign him to be a bit more simple, when the unknowing recipient commented on Instagram “I would love to see it completed, even if it’s not for this swap.” That did me in. I caved. If a BB8 fan (who’s also making a quilt for someone else) doesn’t deserve him, who does?!

Sewfinity is Open!

Head on over to sewfinity.com to see what I’ve been working on. I’ve been curating fabric colors and bundles and it feels so good to release the first batch. There’s lots more coming, so check back often and be sure to follow us on Instagram @sewfinity. I’ve also been curating some really inspiring solid-friendly sewing over at @sewsolid – don’t miss out on those posts!

I love to sew as much as you do, and I’m doing my best to curate the best sewing supplies just for you.

Modern Quilts: Designs of the New Century

Book - Modern Quilts: Designs of the New Century

If you love art and if you love textiles (who doesn’t?), you need this book. It’s full of modern design inspiration, showcasing more than 200 quilts curated by the Modern Quilt Guild.Β Riane, Alissa, and Heather have done a fantastic job of gathering some awesome work into this book of eye candy. To get your copy, find it here:Β Modern Quilts: Designs of the New Century (affiliate link). After looking through this book I bet you’ll think of quilts in a whole new way!

Feel free to linger on page 136, where you’ll find my self portrait quilt. Want to see how I made this quilt? Read my Self Portrait Behind the Pixels post, where I share quite a bit of my making process. (hint: I love to use tech!)

So what is the Modern Quilt Guild, anyway? It’s a community of over 12,000 quilters across six continents and 39 countries, whose mission is to support and encourage the growth and development of modern quilting through art, education, and community. I’m a member of our local chapter, the Boise MQG, serving on the board as Vice President. My favorite part of being involved with the MQG is getting together each month with my sewing peeps – it feels so good to talk to people who love to sew as much as I do! Another highlight is attending QuiltCon each year – it’s the perfect motivation for me to get my design ideas out of my head and into textile form.

Some of the book contributors are hosting a blog tour for the book, and this is my stop. Check out Lysa Flower (yeah! fellow 80’s girl!) for the next post.

Sewfinity is Coming Soon

I’m planning an online sewing shop! It’s named Sewfinity. We wanted our logo to embody sewing and the infinity symbol. Simple, thick lines, and appealing to people who love to sew: young & old, male & female. Here’s what Kampfire Media came up with. We LOVE it.

Sewfinity will feature highly curated quality supplies, and we’re starting with the basics: solids. Keep your eye on sewfinity.com! Also, I’ve started a curated Instagram account that features sewing projects made with solid fabrics: Sew Solid. I’d love it if you’d follow both @sewsolid and @sewfinity!

How to Organize Fabric Swatches with Magnets

I love how this fabric swatch magnet board is both a helpful tool and a piece of art on its own. It looks so good in my sewing room!

Fabric swatches are so helpful when choosing fabrics for your sewing projects. Just like paint chips help you select paint colors, fabric swatch cards help you select just the right color for whatever you’re sewing.

Many fabric manufacturers sell color cards that have swatches of all the fabrics in a collection – such a great resource when making color palettes for your projects. But the problem is that the swatches are often affixed in a set layout, not allowing you to mix and match individual fabrics to your liking. If you’re like me, you want to look at fabric colors independently and arrange them to create unique color combinations.

The answer? Cut them up, just like paint chips! I’ll show you how to cut out fabric swatch card sections, stick magnetic sheets on the back, cut out the individual swatch magnets, and slap them up on a dry erase board. Whiteboards are magnetic! Who knew?!

In this tutorial, I’m sharing two methods: using a fabric swatch card that IS cut-out-friendly, and using one that’s not. Kona Cotton color cards (by Robert Kaufman) are cut-out-friendly, since the fabric swatches and text are all separated and glued in place so that you can easily cut them apart to make individual fabric swatch cards. Most all of the other manufacturer swatch cards are NOT cut-out-friendly, meaning the fabric swatches overlap each other and the text doesn’t line up. No matter which type you have, you can hack your color card – I’ll show you how.

TOOLS AND SUPPLIES

UPDATE: I’ve put together a kit of supplies needed for this tutorial. Just go to https://kit.com/angelabowman/how-to-organize-fabric-swatches-with-magnets, click BUY ALL ON AMAZON, and adjust your cart/quantities as you wish. Easy peasy in a couple clicks.
NOTE: All links are to amazon.com and most are affiliate links.

IF USING A FABRIC SWATCH CARD THAT HAS A CUT-OUT-FRIENDLY LAYOUT (KONA COTTON COLOR CARD)

  • Fabric swatches. I’m using the Robert Kaufman Kona Cotton color card with 303 fabric swatches.
  • Magnetic sheets. Adhesive-backed 8×10” sheets work great.
  • Scissors. Use mixed media shears for cutting through card stock and magnetic sheets.
  • Color wheel. Optional, but fun and helpful.
  • Magnetic dry erase board. I used a 35″ x 23″ whiteboard and this smaller 23″ x 17″ whiteboard would work well for fewer swatches. Make sure it is magnetic – some are, and some aren’t. Also, make sure it’s big enough to fit all your fabric swatches.
  • Installation supplies. Use an artist easel as a nice display support, or use hanging hardware & tools to put the dry erase board up on the wall.

IF USING A SWATCH CARD THAT IS NOT CUT-OUT-FRIENDLY (OR IF USING YOUR OWN LOOSE FABRIC SWATCHES)

  • Same items as above, plus the items below. Make sure the fabric swatches are at least 1” or 2” square (your choice). I prefer to use 1” for fabrics that read as solid colors and 2” for prints.

  • Printer.
  • Card stock. Inexpensive white 8.5×11” sheets will do just fine.
  • Printable swatch card template, available for 1” and 2” fabric swatch squares. Choose between two PDFs:

PDFs that you hand write the fabric details:

PDFs that are pre-populated with the fabric details:

INSTRUCTIONS FOR A FABRIC SWATCH CARD THAT IS CUT-OUT-FRIENDLY (LIKE KONA COTTON)

1. Cut out large sections of cards. Cut out the name of the fabric collection, too.

2. Cut out matching-sized adhesive magnetic sheets. To do this: with a pencil, trace the edges of the large card sections onto the paper side of the magnet. Then cut them out. Or, if you cut them a tiny bit smaller, they’ll be easier to align in the next step.

3. Peel away the adhesive paper from the magnets and press the card sections onto the exposed sticky surface. Align them as best as you can.

4. Cut out the individual swatch cards. Just cut on the lines. You now have a bunch of little fabric magnets!

5. Arrange onto the magnetic dry erase board. Use whatever layout you want!

6. Apply a magnet strip to back of a color wheel and place it on the whiteboard. Use it as a guide to create color palettes! I pressed the adhesive magnet to the back except for the middle portion, so the wheel can still spin around.

7. Install your fabric swatch organizer (formerly just a plain ol’ whiteboard). Put it on the wall, on an artist easel, or just keep it mobile to move around as you want. Enjoy! This whiteboard measures 35″ x 23” and is holding 303 1” fabric swatches, with lots of extra room for creating palettes.

INSTRUCTIONS FOR A FABRIC SWATCH CARD THAT IS NOT CUT-OUT-FRIENDLY (OR IF USING YOUR OWN LOOSE FABRIC SWATCHES)

1. Print the swatch card template PDF onto white card stock. Print at 100% (no scaling).

2. Cut out 1” squares of each of the fabrics. Or 2” squares if you’re using that size of template. A quilting ruler and rotary cutter make it easy. Make sure to keep the fabric squares in order, so you can label them correctly later on.

3. Apply Elmer’s washable school glue along the top 1” of the card rows. Smooth the glue with the foam brush. If using 2” squares, glue along the top 2”. Or, only apply a glue line to just the very top area if you want to keep the swatch loose to be able to feel the fabric between your fingers.

4. Press the fabric squares onto the glued area. After pressing with my fingers, I use a spare sheet of card stock to temporarily place on top and smooth out the entire sheet with my hands – like a pressing cloth.

5. Hand write a fabric details caption under the swatch. Use a fine-point black marker and very small print. TIP: You don’t have to do this step if you get the pre-populated PDF, linked above.

6. Repeat for each of the fabric swatches. To keep everything in order, I do one row at a time.

7. Cut away and discard the empty outer margins. If using a manufacturer’s swatch card, cut out and keep the name of the fabric collection.

8. Cut out matching-sized adhesive magnetic sheets. I’ve sized the swatch card template PDF to be close to 8×10” (a common size for magnetic sheets), so trimming will be minimal or not needed at all. With a pencil, trace the edges of the large card sections onto the paper side of the magnet. Then cut them out. Or, if you cut them a tiny bit smaller, they’ll be easier to align in the next step.

9. Peel away the adhesive paper from the magnets and press the card sections onto the exposed sticky surface. Align them as best as you can.

10. Cut out the individual swatch cards. Just cut on the lines. You now have a bunch of little fabric magnets!

11. Arrange onto the magnetic dry erase board. Use whatever layout you want!

12. Apply a magnet strip to back of a color wheel and place it on the whiteboard. Use it as a guide to create color palettes! I pressed the adhesive magnet to the back except for the middle portion, so the wheel can still spin around.

13. Install your fabric swatch organizer (formerly just a plain ol’ whiteboard). Put it on the wall, on an artist easel, or just keep it mobile to move around as you want. Enjoy! This whiteboard measures 20″ x 16” and is holding 50 1” fabric swatches, with lots of extra room for creating palettes.

TIPS

Make one of these for each color card and have fun making color palettes!

Consider making a single large 2” swatch card for each fabric collection, and only glue the top of the fabric square in place (about 1/4”) so you can feel the fabric and compare to other brands.

The 2” swatches work well for prints. I like making these for basic fabrics that won’t go out-of-print (OOP) anytime soon. These larger swatches show more of the fabric motif and help me visualize combos with other lines of fabric.

Go ahead, hack your color cards and make them into useful magnets!

Endor Quilt

Ah, Endor. Beautiful ancient trees. Rebels and troopers on speeder bikes. The underestimated Ewoks. That dang bunker door.
I designed and made this for an Endor-loving girl as part of the 2017 May the 4th Mini Quilt Swap #MayThe4thMQS2. It measures 24″ x 24″. The design started with my illustration, then I applied some digital effects, put it in a grid, and drew strategic straight lines to make it into a foundation paper piecing (FPP) sewing pattern. It’s very similar to the Vader Quilt I made.

 

I like to get all organized before I sew. Five flat solids for the sky, some grungy teals for the Death Star, a couple greys, and 9 shades of green. The special yellow ruler and postcard from the Idaho Youth Ranch (a non-profit who helps out kids) are great tools to help me keep the seams nice and tidy on the back. Funny note about green #6: it’s leftover fabric from a goblin costume I made for my son years and years ago for Halloween. Another funny note about g6: every time I sewed with it, I sang to myself “like a g6, like a g6”

Sewing up the 5 1/4″ squares and getting them on the design board. I didn’t have enough of the aqua blue fabrics to make up the digital design I came up with, so I made the lightest color white instead.

It’s pretty hard to stop sewing once I get started. Foundation paper piecing (FPP) is addicting.

Five more blocks to go…

Almost done. For my design board, I tape some white flannel onto a sheet of foam core. Pretty perfect. I can push pins in it and easily move it around. And hel-lo, these grunges: so delish.

Blocks are done. Now to sew these puppies together.

My joining method: Sew into rows and press seams open. Leave paper on. Align rows right sides together on an ironing board, put a pin in the intersections and push it all the way in through the ironing board. Put clips on either side, remove the pins, and sew.

You cute wittle death star.

Not gonna lie – music is required for this part. Tearing out the paper is a bit tedious, but worth it to make the design come to life.

Up next, give these back seams a good pressing.

I went with simple straight quilting lines. If I were better at quilting stitches, I’d get a little creative, but it’s just not in my wheelhouse right now. Plus, simple straight lines look good on most anything. Plus, I wanted to be sure not to detract from the piecing design.

Binding time. For the back I used a simple black and white cotton print.

I really really love this tree. The colors. The shape. I’m envisioning a little Ewok hiding in there somewhere.

Stardew Valley Rabbit Pillow

I just made this pillow for my daughter. Her favorite animal from her favorite video game = Easter perfection. She loves playing the Stardew Valley video game (so do I), so I know she’s going to flip when I give this to her. It’s a 16″ pillow that will go great in her bedroom.

I used Adobe Illustrator to make Eric Barone’s design come to life. I also mocked up a bouquet, which I may make later on. Or wouldn’t it be a cool cross-stitch?

I gathered some solid fabrics and printed my map.

I started the layout on the design wall and I got that anxious excited feeling since I knew it was going to turn out so cute!

I filled in the background with larger squares, tile-style.

Then simple, meditative sewing.

These seams are small (1/8″), and I like to press them open for ease in quilting later on. This mini iron is so, so perfect for this task.

This thing is magic. MAGIC, I tell you. #tinyseams #cloverusa #sewing #quilting @cloverusa

A post shared by Angela Bowman (@angelabdesign) on

 

Here’s the back of the patchwork panel. That mini iron makes pretty quick work of the seam-pressing.

And the front. Love it!

Somebunny is getting quilted. I stitched a simple cross-hatch…

…that gives dreamy texture galorrrrrrrre. It’s almost shimmery, even though I only used solids. For the thread, I used Aurifil 30wt in Dove. For the fabrics, I used Kona Cotton by Robert Kaufman.

The finished pillow back has a simple and pretty tied-knot, using a Cotton + Steel basic.

Self Portrait Behind the Pixels at QuiltCon 2017

I am so proud that my quilt β€œSelf Portrait Behind The Pixels” was featured at QuiltCon 2017 in Savannah, Georgia on Feb 23-26. QuiltCon is an international modern quilt show and this is the first time I’ve had a quilt showcased at such a venue. My work was one of only 350 quilts selected from a pool of over 1,500 entries, chosen by a jury of modern quilters.

Though I wasn’t able to attend, a friend of mine took this photo for me. I really enjoyed going through the #quiltcon hashtag on Instagram and seeing pics of all the beautiful work. There’s tons of very talented people making absolutely stunning quilts.